Lucy and Todd

Archive for the ‘Atelier Work’ Category

Edinburgh Festival, August 2013

In Atelier Work on April 3, 2012 at 2:06 pm

Workshops are for jerks. What you need is an editor.

Writing fiction is not a competition, a trial, or a confrontation; it’s a delicate process that thrives on a sensitive and personal response.  What every writer needs is expert and confidential feedback.  Our approach is one on one, working with writers at their own pace.

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Many thanks to everyone who attended our afternoon salons last August at The French Fancies. Many thanks to The French Fancies too!

We will be happy to meet writers during the Festival this year too (2013), for an initial FREE consultation. Just let us know a time that suits you, and join us for a short consultation about your fiction project.

Send your work ahead of time or bring it with you (we will look at up to 20 pages without charge) – or just come and talk about what you’re writing or think you might like to write.

Email: fictionatelier@gmail.com

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The ‘atelier’ model

In Atelier Work on September 23, 2011 at 3:44 pm

We protect the right, of both student and teacher, to write.  We are in this together!  Our cause: the preservation of literature.

The Fiction Atelier is based on the art studio model, in which artist and student work together, the student benefiting from acquaintance with a practising artist who has decades of experience in the craft and an ongoing involvement in it. In the Fiction Atelier, there is time to talk about books in general, and the tricks of the trade, as well as line-editing and commenting on specific pieces of work. Our aim is to challenge students, and to expand their approach to writing.

Many Creative Writing courses are taught by writers who have had to sacrifice their own literary enterpises in order to teach.  Such demands can leave a teacher stale, resentful and despairing.  This is what we avoid at the Fiction Atelier.  We feel we can offer students more real help by coming fresh to the task, direct from daily work on our own fiction.  The student is thus welcomed into an energetic atmosphere of mutual literary effort.